Artificial Intelligence (AI) is one of those technologies, like advances in gene editing or quantum computing, which has the power to change life itself. It has the potential to transform economies, unlock new societal and environmental value and accelerate scientific discovery. With AI estimated to generate $13 trillion in economic activity globally by 2030, the global race to lead in AI is well and truly underway.

Below, we’ve curated a series video recordings from panels and interviews on artificial intelligence (AI) taken from Australia’s premier technology science showcase, D61+ LIVE 2019.

 



Moderator:
Brad Howarth
Speakers: Dr Simon Barry, Acting Director, CSIRO’s Data61, Tim Finnigan, CSIRO, Denis Bauer, CSIRO Health & Biosecurity, Dr Terry O’Kane, CSIRO Oceans & Atmosphere, Dr Jen Taylor, CSIRO Genomics and Data Science
About: CSIRO scientists discuss how AI is already achieving impact as a force for social and environmental good. From predicting the climate in the coming decade and using AI to better understand how and why droughts occur, to identifying the gene that causes Motor Neuron Disease. This panel discusses the fascinating possibilities and outcomes already emerging as the result of AI research at the national science agency across climate, health, energy, agriculture, health and biosecurity domains.

Speaker: Dr Amir Dezfouli
About: An interactive AI-powered computer game that clinicians can utilise to diagnose a patient’s mental health. The game provides medical professionals with the ability to see a patient’s brain processes in response to tailored stimuli, unlike traditional mental health assessments which only measure a patient’s response to direct questions about their mental state. Here, lead researcher Dr Amir Dezfouli, neuroscientist and machine learning expert at CSIRO’s Data61, explains how the platform works, challenges, and benefits.

Moderator: Brad Howarth
Speakers: Prof Genevieve Bell, 3A Institute, Dr Stefan Hajkowicz, CSIRO’s Data61, Emma Martinho-Truswell, Oxford Insights, Adrian Turner
About: Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning systems are being rapidly adopted around the world. By 2030, AI is estimated to generate $13 trillion in economic activity across the world. This panel discussion explores how we must develop and deploy AI technologies today, and how this will critically shape our future world. Hear from some of the region’s top AI experts about the questions we need to be asking ourselves as a society, and how we can capitalise on the trillion-dollar AI opportunity.

Speaker: Dr Mahesh Prakash
About: Dr Mahesh Prakash on Spark, Data61’s bushfire prediction modelling tool. Spark is an open framework for fire prediction and analysis. It takes our current knowledge of fire behaviour and combines it with state-of-the-art simulation science to produce predictions, statistics and visualisations of bushfire spread.

Moderator: Alezeia Brown, CSIRO’s Data61
Speakers: Dr Cheng Soon Ong, CSIRO’s Data61, Dr Sue Keay, CSIRO’s Data61, Dr Olivier Salvado, CSIRO’s Data61 Hear from our subject matter experts on the latest developments in artificial intelligence and machine learning, what the future has in store, and the big research questions that remain.


Artificial Intelligence Roadmap

Without a coordinated effort to drive AI development and adoption in Australia, valuable economic opportunities will be missed to build and capitalise on our capabilities in AI and related domains.

CSIRO is uniquely placed to drive Australia’s national AI program, positioned at the intersection of government, industry and the research community, and with deep connectivity into the nation’s digital and domain capability.

Artificial Intelligence: Solving problems, growing the economy and improving our quality of life outlines the importance of action for Australia to capture the benefits of artificial intelligence (AI), estimated to be worth AU$22.17 trillion to the global economy by 2030.

To learn more about the adoption and development of AI technology in Australia, download the AI Roadmap here.